jPrime'2017 videos (2017)

We mess this thing everytime - the videos are always late.

After 5 months we have the 2017 edition recordings. Enjoy.

The videos are in the Bulgarian Java User Group's youtube channel.

Regards,
The Bulgarian Java User Group

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jPrime 2017 slides (2017)

Here are the slides from jPrime 2017

The JCP & The Future of Java, Heather VanCura
Automata-Based Programming - General Purpose Finite State Machines, Daniela Kolarova
A Pragmatist’s Guide to Functional Geekery, Michał Płachta
Fantastic Java contracts - and where to define them?, Milen Dyankov
Non-blocking Michael-Scott queue algorithm, Alexey Fyodorov
Easily scale enterprise applications using distributed data grids, Ondrej Mihaly
Full-Text Search Explained, Philipp Krenn
The Art of Clean Code, Victor Rentea
Turbo Charge CPU Utilization in Fork/Join Using the ManagedBlocker, Heinz Kabutz
Distributed Tracing, get a grasp on your production, Nakul Mishra
JAX-RS 2.1 Reloaded!, David Delabassee
Gluing the IoT world with Java and LoRaWAN, Panche Chavkovski
Riding the Jet Streams, Christoph Engelbert
Enterprise JavaScript... What the Heck?!, Vladimir Pavlov, Nedelcho Delchev

Hacking Streams and Collectors, Jose Paumard
Picking the right AWS backend for your Java app, Julien Simon
Spring Framework 5: Themes & Trends, Juergen Hoeller
Building an Enterprise Data Fabric at Royal Bank of Scotland, Mike Fulke
Cluster your MicroProfile Application using CDI and JCache, Roberto Cortez
CI/CD of blockchain smart contracts using Java and eDuke, Frédéric Hubin
Fibers – blocking is cheap in a Parallel Universe, Stefan Minev
High Performance Managed Languages, Martin Thompson
Competitive food retail architecture with microservices, Ansgar Brauner, Sebastian Gauder
JUnit 5 - The Next Generation, Kostadin Golev
Java EE 7 meets Java 8, Roberto Cortez
Reactive Mesh, Kalin Maldzhanski
Building High Performance Applications with Spring Data and MongoDB, Kiril Stefanov

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Interview with Christoph Engelbert (2017)

Christoph EngelbertThe JCache guy

With a great pleasure we will welcome Chris Engelpert for the second time here in Bulgaria for #jPrime2017! A small interview with him just before our conference:

Hi Chris! Can you please introduce yourself?
Hey, I’m Christoph Engelbert, Manager of Developer Relations at Hazelcast. That said right now, I’m doing exactly what my CEO expect from me: I’m in a hotel somewhere in the world, answering interview questions from somewhere else in the world, flying to yet somewhere else afterwards.
In general, the probably best way to describe my job is a lot of airports, airplanes, taxis, hotels, conference center, and trolling on twitter :-)

This will be your second visit to Bulgaria and our JUG. First time we were talking about JCache. What about will be your talk on this edition of jPrime?
Yeah it’s the second time and Bulgaria is really nice. Looking forward to come back!
At jPrime I’ll talk about Jet Streams. That means the fast flowing air currents around the world. In a more technical fashion, it’ll be about Hazelcast’s new stream processing framework, Hazelcast Jet. Given that, we’ll do some cool live coding (if you’re fast enough also hands-on) for our take on a distributed java.util.stream implementation, as well as a little bit of the much more powerful, underlying DAG API. For people that don’t know yet what that means, join the talk and learn about DAGs. If I get the chance and I’m still trying to make this happen, we will do live calculations with Hazelcast Jet from a live data feed of the World’s Jet Stream using java.util.stream APIs, doesn’t that sound like a good bridging of topics? ;-)

You were very active in the sun.misc.Unsafe debate recently. What is your take on the upcoming Java 9 in general and particularly in project Jigsaw?
I’d say good and bad. Given that I’m answering these questions relatively late (or because I’m good at fortune telling) I know that the first Jigsaw JSR proposal (JSR376) was down voted by the JCP EC yesterday, whereas the umbrella JSR for Java 9 (JSR379) was accepted. So the overall feature set of Java 9 is perfectly fine to the EC, however the specification for Jigsaw still is not yet clear enough or some issues still have to be fixed. The expert group now has 30 days to fix the spec and resubmit.
I was one of the people to down vote it in the EC and I stated my issues with the current specification, mostly based around two facts. The missing consensus inside the EG itself, as well as problematic “features” like the warnings if you activate “—permit-illegal-access”.
In general I think Jigsaw is a good idea, however I would like to see it as an “implementation detail” of the JVM. I don’t think it solves too many real world problems, as without versions support it is only meaningful to people that control all bits of the system. That certainly is the JDK team itself and maybe a handful of users building monolithic-styled applications. For Hazelcast, as a library vendor, we need versions. And to make sure we’re all on the same page, I’m talking about simple versioning, like “our Hibernate-Integration version X works with Hibernate version Y to Z” and not the famous multiple versions in the JVM at the same time because log4j 1.x was so badly designed - that is a whole lot of a different story.
That said, I don’t think Jigsaw will have too much influence and the adoption rate for Java 9 might still be low, but thanks to our “kill-switch”, slightly higher than it was expected a few months ago. JShell… nah, don’t get me started. HTTP2, yep definitely nice, would be a back port for Java 8 too (I think), so nothing too wow for Java 9. My personal favorite though is the Stack Walking API (http://openjdk.java.net/jeps/259)! I guess I would call my relationship to Java 9 as “acquaintance” but there are relationship goals to meet ;-)

You work as “developer relations”. What are the challenges in that new type of job that we see in a lot of companies nowadays?
I would say the biggest problem, traveling the world which is a big part of the job, is, that there’s still no way to beam myself from point A to point B in the blink of an eye. Weren’t we supposed to have this by now, looking back at the movies and series of the 80s? Maybe the USA did already invent it and is just not telling us? :-( The second biggest challenge is community management. A lot of the work is manual and people want to be entertained but also being showed appreciation for their work, which is just fair. I love my job and I love to see when people take something and make it their own, no matter if we’re talking about an issue, a pull request, a blogpost or whatever. And, as mentioned, I love to show appreciation, that’s where the Hazelcast Hero program comes in to specifically honor the most active community members.
Apart from that, I don’t think there are too many other problems or they all derive from what was said above, like in Developer Relations you need to show the effectiveness of the program because traveling is expensive. You see, beaming would help :-)

Is there something you like to do except programming?
I love cooking and barbecue, or let’s better said, I love food in general. Since I don’t see too much of the actual places I travel to, I always love to get the real local food experience and it hurt my soul going to India and knowing you cannot get street food without ending up ill. A lot of people wouldn’t believe it but I really enjoy eating and especially trying new, yet unknown, food. Apart from that, my life’s pretty boring and mostly consists of working on one project or the other. Fortunately there’s one more point to my life I really don’t want to miss, my wife. She’s a huge support since traveling means you’re not home too often and I guess there are not too many people to be ok with that.

Thank you very much! See you soon in Sofia!

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Michał Płachta (2017)

Michał PłachtaThe AKKA Guy
Polyglot software engineer specialized in developing distributed applications. During last 15 years of professional experience he has built applications in Perl, PHP, C++, C#, Ruby, JavaScript, Java and now Scala. Currently he works as team leader at Ocado Technology, where he builds actor-based software for automated warehouse.
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Building High Performance Applications with Spring Data and MongoDB (2017)

Kiril StefanovThe MongoDB Guy

MongoDB is the most popular Open Source document-based database these days. With Spring Data REST and Spring Data Repository abstraction that let’s you seamlessly interact with MongoDB you can build scalable and high performance REST applications for minutes. This talk walks you through the process of using Spring Data MongoDB to build a Self-Service Catalog application that stores data in and retrieves it from MongoDB.


Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
I am software engineer with more than 13 years experience in Java Enterprise application development. I have been teaching Java EE courses in various IT academies and software companies where I built strong teams of Java professionals. In the last 6 years, I am working at VMware as Technical lead responsible for XaaS features of VMware's vRealize Cloud Automation software.

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Reactive Mesh (2017)

Kalin MaldzhanskiThe Reactive Guy

Overview on some of the reactive frameworks for Java (RxJava 1.x/2.x, Project Reactor, Akka,). Examples, comparison and interoperability. Functional reactive programming is a hype today. RxJava 1.x got popular very fast and started to be used everywhere, sometimes in many ways it wasn't supposed to be. RxJava isn't the only one going the reactive way, there are others. In this talk we will talk about RxJava1.x/2.x Project Reactor, Akka-Streams and Reactive Streams. We will see examples of all, compare performance and functionalities and see how they can talk to each other. For this talk it would be useful to know basic Reactive principles and some experience with at least one 'reactive' library.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Developer&Maker who loves technology, automation, optimization and confrontation. Hobbies DIY, Open Source, Open Data. I have been involved in development since windows 3.11 and mobile development since the days of Pocket PC 2002 and doing cool stuff since. IoT&DIY enthusiast, Open Data Advocate, Open Source contributor, freelance consultant @AppTik, Co-Founder @Linked.Farm, Big Fan of Rakia.

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CI/CD of blockchain smart contracts using Java and eDuke (2017)

Frédéric HubinThe Smart Contracts Guy

Blockchain is a hot topic especially the smart contract feature. Smart contracts allow to customize the rules applicable to digital assets deployed on a blockchain. On the Ethereum blockchain, Solidity is the usual programming language used to develop smart contract. With the use of eDuke, a Java framework allowing easy interactions with the Ethereum blockchain, we will show how to continuously deploy and test smart contracts and "oracle" code using JUnit, Jenkins and Maven.


Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Frédéric has more than 20 years of experience in programming. He started programming in Java in 1996 while still in College. In 1998, he joined the Swiss Java Center in Zuerich and has been working for Sun Microsystems for a couple of years. Since then, Frédéric has been working for major banks in Europe and currently holds a position as a Senior Java Architect at the financial markets department of ING in Brussels. Frédéric is a blockchain enthusiast and is also working on the concrete application of the blockchain technologies to derivative instruments.

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JUnit 5 - The Next Generation (2017)

Kostadin GolevThe JUnit Guy

JUnit is the standard way to test things in Java. In fact, it is the most commonly included external library for Java projects! Here is another fact - JUnit4 release was 11 years ago and no feature releases were added in recent years. What you knew about JUnit in 2010 is still 100% relevant today, in 2017. So finally, time for upgrade! What took 11 years? What is new? What changed and what stayed the same? What about IDE and build tool support? When is the release date? What will testing on the JVM look like in the future? Attend this talk to find out!

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Kostadin is experienced Java Developer and team leader with strong interest in test automation. Always on a quest of continuous improvement, Kostadin believes small efforts over time quickly add up. When not busy with work and family, he likes to write and share his experiences at kgolev.com.

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Competitive food retail architecture with microservices (2017)

Two years ago we started refactoring a monolithic shop into an e-commerce micro service platform. By now we’ve grown to 150 developers. In this talk we want to share our journey and the lessons we’ve learned the hard way. After agreeing on a few terms about microservices we want to provide some answers to problems we ran into: - What kind of organizational structure do you need to reflect the vertical boundaries in software while growing fast? - How do you define bounded contexts with many teams and features? Are there ways to guide your teams and enable autonomy on all levels in your organization? - Can you enable your teams to develop and deploy independently all the way to production? - How does asynchronous communication with Apache Kafka change the way you think about your entities? - How can multiple microservices contribute to the same pages? (And why you might have to implement this twice...) As you see we will share our interpretation of a micro service architecture where developers stay in the driver’s seat and have a fair degree of independence and participation. On top of this you will learn something about the characteristics of online food retail, running your own fleet of delivery trucks and taking care of three temperature zones.

Level:
BEGINNER

Bio:

Ansgar BraunerThe REWE Architect

Ansgar Brauner is working at REWE Digital as Software Architect, taking care of the bounded context Fulfillment. After working at Zalando he started at REWE Digital to help one of Europe’s biggest food retailers (REWE, Penny, Billa) building the leading food eCommerce platform in Europe. Beside enabling 6 teams to work autonomously he helps the product owners to not neglect the technical view. Ansgar leads the Java User Group Dortmund and likes playing around with Microcontrollers.

Sebastian GauderThe REWE Architect

Sebastian Gauder is working at REWE Digital as Software Architect, taking care of the bounded context Site landing. After working at Adobe they he started at REWE Digital to help one of Europe’s biggest food retailers (REWE, Penny, Billa) building the leading food eCommerce platform in Germany. Beside enabling 4 teams to work autonomously he helps the product owners to not neglect the technical view. Sebastian spends his spare time playing inline hockey.

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High Performance Managed Languages (2017)

Martin ThompsonThe Performance guy

Common wisdom dictates that native languages are the only means of building high-performance applications. How do managed runtimes such as those available to .NET, Java, and even JavaScript, yes even JavaScript compare? Many applications requiring high-performance are now developed for managed runtimes - such as financial trading, data stores and analytics, messaging processing, and even supercomputing. Over the last few decades we have seen significant advances in managed runtimes, particularly for JIT compilers and garbage collectors. In this talk we will explore how our managed runtimes can equal, and even better in some cases, the performance of native languages.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Martin is a Java Champion with over 2 decades of experience building complex and high-performance computing systems. He is most recently known for his work on Aeron and SBE. Previously at LMAX he was the co-founder and CTO when he created the Disruptor. Prior to LMAX Martin worked for Betfair, three different content companies wrestling with the world largest product catalogues, and was a lead on some of the most significant C++ and Java systems of the 1990s in the automotive and finance domains. Believing in Mechanical Sympathy he started the hugely popular blog and discussion group of the same name. Mechanical Sympathy is about having sufficient understanding of the underlying stack and hardware to achieve great performance from our software. While typically called in to help clients with performance problems, Martin is often "trapped" by clients who want his help with the whole software development lifecycle once they sample his delivery approach. Martin can often be found speaking on the international technology conference scene where he gives talks that range from how to build technical teams through to detailed aspects of software design for specific hardware.

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Ask the Spring Architect (2017)

Juergen HoellerThe Spring guy

self-moderated Q&A session

Bio:
Juergen Hoeller is co-founder of the Spring Framework open source project and has been serving as the project lead and release manager for the core framework since 2003. Juergen is an experienced software architect and consultant with outstanding expertise in code organization, transaction management and enterprise messaging.

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Fibers – blocking is cheap in a Parallel Universe (2017)

Stefan MinevThe Fibers Guy

Fibers are lightweight threads implemented for the JVM by the Quasar open source library. One application can spawn millions of fibers in a single JVM. Blocking a fiber is cheap because it doesn’t mean blocking the OS thread. So, by using fibers the common synchronous programming can benefit from the performance boost of the asynchronous programming but without the additional complexity of the callback-based approach. This talk will cover the general idea behind the fibers and what is offered by the Quasar and the Comsat libraries to create fiber-powered RESTful web based applications. The live demo will show the basic usage of fibers in a Spring Boot application.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Stefan is a Senior Software Engineer at Paysafe. He is primarily working on Java backend applications in one of the payments related teams in the company. He likes to experiment with different programming languages and technologies and is a strong believer that the “Clean Code” is the best way to build quality software.

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Java EE 7 meets Java 8 (2017)

Roberto CortezThe Java EE Guy

The last few years have been pretty exciting for Java with new versions of EE and SE platforms. Java EE, introduced a new API to build WebSockets; a new API to parse, process and generate JSON; a new Client API in JAX-RS to invoke REST services, and finally the Batch Processing API to build batch applications. Java SE brought us the long awaited Lambda expressions; the powerful Streams API to perform operations like filtering, mapping or sorting in a very easy and fluent way, and a brand new Date Time API, to deal with the complexities of Timezones and Periods. This session will combine all of these elements together and show you how to easily develop an application using Java SE 8 with Java EE 7, with live coding and samples.

Level:
BEGINNER

Bio:
My name is Roberto Cortez and I was born in Venezuela, but I have spent most of my life in Coimbra – Portugal, where I currently live. I am a professional Java Developer working in the software development industry, with more than 8 years of experience in business areas like Finance, Insurance and Government. I have finished my degree in Informatics Engineering (equivalent to the Bologna Master’s degree) from the Department of Informatics Engineering of the University of Coimbra in 2006, however I started to learn and enjoy Java in 1998. I work with many Java based technologies like JavaEE, Spring, Hibernate, GWT, JBoss AS and Maven just to name a few, always relying on my favorite IDE: IntelliJ IDEA. As a Freelancer / Independent Contractor I travelled around the world (an old dream) to customers, but also to attend Java conferences. The direct contact with the Java community made me want to become an active member in the community itself. For that reason, I have created the Coimbra Java User Group, started to contribute to Open Source on Github and launched this blog, so I can share some of the knowledge that I gained over the years. I hope you find it useful! Currently, I’m working with Tomitribe. After working for a few major corporations, I’m eager to help and grow something from the ground up. I’m very excited to work with all the amazing tribers working hard to make TomEE a compelling Java EE server.

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Cluster your MicroProfile Application using CDI and JCache (2017)

Roberto CortezThe Java EE Guy

Microprofile is a new platform definition that optimizes Enterprise Java for a microservices architecture and delivers application portability across multiple runtimes. You can use a subset of the Java EE spec to develop Microprofile applications, with JAX-RS, CDI and JSON-P. Now you need to make it highly available and scalable across a large number of machines. The session will feature a live coding demo where we will turn this Microprofile application, into a fully clustered application using a CDI extension and producers to integrate Hazelcast as a JCache provider. Finally, to show you how light it is, we will run the entire cluster in a set up of Raspberry PI's.

Level:
BEGINNER

Bio:
My name is Roberto Cortez and I was born in Venezuela, but I have spent most of my life in Coimbra – Portugal, where I currently live. I am a professional Java Developer working in the software development industry, with more than 8 years of experience in business areas like Finance, Insurance and Government. I have finished my degree in Informatics Engineering (equivalent to the Bologna Master’s degree) from the Department of Informatics Engineering of the University of Coimbra in 2006, however I started to learn and enjoy Java in 1998. I work with many Java based technologies like JavaEE, Spring, Hibernate, GWT, JBoss AS and Maven just to name a few, always relying on my favorite IDE: IntelliJ IDEA. As a Freelancer / Independent Contractor I travelled around the world (an old dream) to customers, but also to attend Java conferences. The direct contact with the Java community made me want to become an active member in the community itself. For that reason, I have created the Coimbra Java User Group, started to contribute to Open Source on Github and launched this blog, so I can share some of the knowledge that I gained over the years. I hope you find it useful! Currently, I’m working with Tomitribe. After working for a few major corporations, I’m eager to help and grow something from the ground up. I’m very excited to work with all the amazing tribers working hard to make TomEE a compelling Java EE server.

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Building an Enterprise Data Fabric at Royal Bank of Scotland (2017)

Mike FulkeThe RBS Guy

When addressing common investment banking use-cases, incumbent application architectures have proven themselves to be complex, difficult to maintain and expensive. Driven by the apparently competing pressures of cost and agility, RBS has combined several technologies including Netty, MongoDB, Apache Kafka and Apache Zookeeper to build a common enterprise data fabric which is underpinning several core trading platforms. In this session, you will learn how RBS has successfully integrated these technologies into a wider Java-based architecture, built with a strong open source bias.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Mike is a platform architect at RBS with more than 20 years’ experience in Financial Services technology. His expertise covers risk management and electronic trading systems for Fixed Income markets using Java, C++ and C#.

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Spring Framework 5: Themes & Trends (2017)

Juergen HoellerThe Spring guy

Spring Framework 5 (scheduled for general availability in June) comes with a strong focus on several themes: reactive web applications based on Reactive Streams, functional configuration with Java 8 as well as the Kotlin language, comprehensive support for JDK 9 and HTTP/2, plus the latest API generations in the Enterprise Java ecosystem. This talk presents the overall story in the context of wider industry trends, highlighting Spring's unique programming model strategy.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Juergen Hoeller is co-founder of the Spring Framework open source project and has been serving as the project lead and release manager for the core framework since 2003. Juergen is an experienced software architect and consultant with outstanding expertise in code organization, transaction management and enterprise messaging.

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Picking the right AWS backend for your Java app (2017)

Julien SimonThe AWS Guy

When it comes to data processing, software applications have many different requirements, which cannot be satisfied by a single backend. This is why AWS has built a number of data services, such as DynamoDB, RDS, EMR, Redshift and Athena. In this technical session, you will learn about their respective strengths and how you can best use them in your Java apps. We'll give you pragmatic real-life advice on what these backend mean technically, operationally and financially. No solution is perfect, you need to be aware of the trade-offs. Of course, code and live demos will illustrate the discussion.

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
Julien Simon, Principal Technical Evangelist at Amazon Web Services. Before joining AWS, Julien served for 10 years as CTO/VP Engineering in top-tier web startups. Thus, he’s particularly interested in all things architecture, deployment, performance, scalability and data. As a Principal Technical Evangelist, Julien speaks very frequently at conferences and technical workshops, where he meets developers and enterprises to help them bring their ideas to life thanks to the Amazon Web Services infrastructure.

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Hacking Streams and Collectors (2017)

Jose PaumardThe Streams guy

Java 8 has been released a bit more than 3 years ago, with a major addition: the Stream API. This API brings new patterns to process data and new ways to organize applications. This API is not new anymore, but there are still many ways to use it that are yet to be discovered. This session is almost 100% live coding and will browse through the most important patterns of both API. Simple ones, complex one, useful ones, funny ones, well-known ones, unexpected ones. Live coding allows for interaction, questions and answers. I hope we will have fun together in this session!

Level:
INTERMEDIATE

Bio:
José is an assistant professor at the Institut Galilée (Université Paris 13), PhD in applied mathematics from the ENS de Cachan. He has also worked as one of the lead members of the Paris JUG for 6 years, and is a co-founder of Devoxx France. As a member of the CDI 2.0 Expert Group, he has contributed new ways of handling events, especially in the asynchronous part of the spec. He provided new patterns that have been adopted by the EG. José has been working as an independent programmer for 20 years and is a well-known Java / Java EE / software craftsmanship expert and trainer. His expertise includes Tomcat, JBoss, Weblogic, Websphere, Glassfish, and the most popular Java EE parts: JPA (Hibernate & Eclipselink), EJB (including version 2), JMS, JTA, the Web tier, and more. José speaks at conferences, including JavaOne and Devoxx; and writes technical articles for various publications including Java Magazine and Oracle Technology Network. Passionate about education, he publishes MOOC for several companies: Oracle Virtual Technology Summit, Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy and Voxxed.

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Juergen Hoeller (2017)

Juergen HoellerThe Spring guy

Juergen Hoeller is co-founder of the Spring Framework open source project and has been serving as the project lead and release manager for the core framework since 2003. Juergen is an experienced software architect and consultant with outstanding expertise in code organization, transaction management and enterprise messaging.

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Martin Thompson (2017)

Martin ThompsonThe Performance guy
Martin is a Java Champion with over 2 decades of experience building complex and high-performance computing systems. He is most recently known for his work on Aeron and SBE. Previously at LMAX he was the co-founder and CTO when he created the Disruptor. Prior to LMAX Martin worked for Betfair, three different content companies wrestling with the world largest product catalogues, and was a lead on some of the most significant C++ and Java systems of the 1990s in the automotive and finance domains. Believing in Mechanical Sympathy he started the hugely popular blog and discussion group of the same name. Mechanical Sympathy is about having sufficient understanding of the underlying stack and hardware to achieve great performance from our software. While typically called in to help clients with performance problems, Martin is often "trapped" by clients who want his help with the whole software development lifecycle once they sample his delivery approach. Martin can often be found speaking on the international technology conference scene where he gives talks that range from how to build technical teams through to detailed aspects of software design for specific hardware.
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Agenda (2017)


Track 1 (Hall A) Track 2 (Hall B)
8:00
9:30
Registration & Coffee
9:30
10:00
Opening (Go5)
10:00
10:50
The JCP & The Future of Java
Heather VanCura
Automata-Based Programming -
General Purpose Finite State Machines

Daniela Kolarova
10:50
11:05
Break
11:05
11:55
A Pragmatist’s Guide to Functional Geekery
Michał Płachta
Fantastic Java contracts -
and where to define them?

Milen Dyankov
11:55
12:10
Break
12:10
13:00
Non-blocking Michael-Scott queue algorithm
Alexey Fyodorov
Easily scale enterprise applications
using distributed data grids

Ondrej Mihaly
13:00
14:00
Lunch break
14:00
14:50
Full-Text Search Explained
Philipp Krenn
The Art of Clean Code
Victor Rentea
14:50
15:05
Break
15:05
15:55
Turbo Charge CPU Utilization in
Fork/Join Using the ManagedBlocker

Heinz Kabutz
Distributed Tracing,
get a grasp on your production

Nakul Mishra
15:55
16:30
Coffee Break
16:30
17:20
JAX-RS 2.1 Reloaded!
David Delabassee
Gluing the IoT world
with Java and LoRaWAN

Panche Chavkovski
17:20
17:35
Break
17:35
18:25
Riding the Jet Streams
Christoph Engelbert
Enterprise JavaScript...
What the Heck?!

Vladimir Pavlov, Nedelcho Delchev
18:25
19:00
Raffle
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New community partner: HUJAK (2017)

We are pleased to welcome the Croatian Java user group (HUJAK) as a community partner of jPrime.


They are organizing two great community conferences in Croatia: Javantura which is currently a one-day conference with a focus on latest trends in the Java world and its bigger brother conference called JavaCro which is at the beginning of May just a few weeks before jPrime (call-for-papers is currently opened until beginning of March).

They recently announced officially the 2017 edition of jPrime on their community web site: https://hujak.hr/2017/02/19/jprime-conference-in-sofia.
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